Import of Korean M1 Garands and M1 Carbines Blocked

23 Aug

“Korean War Rifles Sold Back to US” was the title of a promising news story out of Seoul last Fall.  The proposed sale consisted of 86,000 M1 rifles and another 22,000 M1 carbines. Reportedly they were to be sold to one or more of a pre-selected group of six US wholesalers. CMP was not involved in the deal. The Koreans expected to sell Garands for $220 Carbines for $140! Many shooters and collectors were looking forward to buying a genuine Korean war Garand or carbine. Never mind the thought of the Koreans selling rifles back to us that we gave them….

US soldiers in front-line trench during Korean War. With rifle, left, PFC. Richard Pantoliano of Brooklyn, N.Y., and right, foreground, with carbine is PFC. Robert Curtis of Torrance, Calif. Other soldiers, background, are unidentified - 1 May 1951

Well, according to the Koreans, the current US Administration (the specific agency or official was not named) have stymied efforts to bring these rifles back to the US.

The problems the U.S. government cited were somewhat ambiguous, said an official at the Ministry of National Defense on condition of anonymity.

“The U.S. insisted that imports of the aging rifles could cause problems such as firearm accidents. It was also worried the weapons could be smuggled to terrorists, gangs or other people with bad intentions,” the official told The Korea Times.

John at No Lawyers – Only Guns and Money blog posted a great response to this nonsense:

As to the assertion by some unnamed U.S. official that gangs might use M-1 Garands, I think someone watched the movie Gran Torino a few too many times. Can you imagine how many cases of “M-1 thumb” there would be if the Crips, the Bloods, or the Latin Kings were to attempt to use a M-1 Garand?

Lets hope that someone in the current administration comes to their senses, or more likely that enough grass-roots pressure is applied by interested collectors and shooters, so that importation of these fine historical arms can begin.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: